Book review: Birdy by Jess Vallance

Birdy
by Jess Vallance

25269375

Publication: 02/07/2015
Paperback
Publisher: Hot Key Books, Bonnier Zaffre
★★★★

I have been reading lots of books lately so there’s various reviews that I have to share on my blog but I wanted to post this one first not only because I enjoyed the book but also because it’s been a while since I read a YA novel and this is one that captured my attention from the very beginning.

Birdy is the story of Frances Bird, a teenager who has been a loner for so long that she’s given up on ever finding real friendship. However, when she’s asked to show a new girl – Alberta – around school, she begins to think her luck could finally be changing. 

Eccentric, talkative and just a little bit posh, Alberta is not at all how Frances imagined a best friend could be. But the two girls click immediately, and it’s not long before they are inseparable. Frances could not be happier.

As the weeks go on, Frances finds out more about her new best friend – her past, her secrets, her plans for the future – and she starts to examine their friendship more closely.

Is it, perhaps, just too good to be true?

– – – –

Nothing can prepare you for this darkly compulsive tale of friendship and obsession; I mean it: nothing. I’ve always been a great fan of YA but Birdy is different from anything I’ve ever read before.

The book started out as a usual high school story but became creepier and creepier as the chapters went on.
As mentioned in the synopsis, the whole book revolves around Frances and her friendship with Alberta. Frances narrates the story and presents the reader with different episodes about their days at school, the time they spend together hanging around and how their friendship develops. I thought all these episodes would have a strong meaning and that some truth was going to be revealed but they don’t- which I found a bit frustrating – and they are there just to entertain the reader.

As I kept reading I started to feel uncomfortable with Frances and her way of thinking. Just as one of they many reviews on goodreads affirms: ‘the more you read the more messed up it becomes until you’re left seriously disturbed’. Well, I couldn’t agree more. This book is notoriously dark.
Frances – who in the beginning seems like a ‘normal’ teenager who lives with her grandparents and has always been quite lonely – becomes obsessed with her new friend and controls everything she does. She is manipulative and becomes terribly fixated with the idea that Alberta is ‘hers’.

Another aspect that I would like to mention is the writing because I found it addictive. I finished the book in two days – honestly, I couldn’t put it down. It’s not very long and it’s a very well-written YA novel which ending horrified me.

I know I have said it before but I ended up terribly disturbed! I didn’t expect such a shock! And I loved it.  The story ends with a magnificent (and very dark) twist which the reader won’t see coming. 

Jess Vallance’s new book – The Yellow Room  will be published in August 2016 (Hot Key Books) and I am already looking forward to it.

Book review: Not Working by Lisa Owens

Not Working
By Lisa Owens

9781509806546

Publication: 21/04/2016
Hardback
Publisher: Picador, Pan Macmillan
★★★

Lisa Owens’ novel was one that I was really looking forward to read. Luckily, one of my colleagues told me she had a proof copy – the perks of working in the publishing industry, right? – and she was going to let me read it. Bless her, that made my day.

Not Working presents Claire Flannery – the heroine of the story – who has voluntarily quit her full time job in London in order to discover her true vocation. However, she soon realises that… she has no idea how to find it! All the new extra time that comes with being unemployed only encourages her to dwell on the uncertainties of her life. While everyone around her seems to have their lives entirely under control, Claire finds herself sinking under pressure and wondering where her own fell apart.

‘It’s fine,’ her grandmother says. ‘I remember what being your age was like – of course, I had four children under eight then, but modern life is different, you’ve got an awful lot on…’

———

Picador really knows how to promote a book and they have done amazingly well with this one. When I read the synopsis I realised that – even though I had (and have!) an awful (and lovely) lot of books to read – I was going to put everything on the side and try to find out what Claire Flannery was all about.

I saw the novel a few times at different Waterstones and I couldn’t help to admire its cover, with those unusual bright colours. The thing is when you see a book with this kind of  jacket, you know it’s going to be something special. Indeed, the subject and the heroine seem to break with traditions and even the way Owens has written her book is quite peculiar.

The novel’s format presents the story through short vignettes and thoughts under headings which at first I found a little bit off-putting. However, as I settled into it, I found myself really enjoying it. It is true that a character like Claire, this kind of anti-heroine who doesn’t know what she wants and seems to be lost in the modern world, can be found in previous titles such as The Diary of Bridget Jones but I don’t agree with reviewers who have stated that Claire is the new Bridget. They are completely different characters and the reasons why they decide to quit their jobs are definitely not the same. As far as I can remember, Bridget Jones leaves her publishing job because she doesn’t want to be next to her boss Daniel after he lied to her. On the other hand, Claire leaves because she wants to try to find herself which is a completely different reason – and a better one! Whether she succeeds or not – you’ll have to find out by reading the book… of course!

Having said this, I must add that – even though I liked the book and the way the author presents the story – I was expecting so much more. It ended quite suddenly and I was left with this weird ‘is-that-it?’ kind of feeling.

So many good things were said about the novel that I genuinely thought it was going to be unique and made me laugh out loud. It didn’t. It’s a funny book, don’t get me wrong, and it’s very well written but I still cannot see what all the hype is about. Definitely a good read and something you’ll enjoy. I don’t think this book will ‘change your life’ , though. But then again… not all books are meant to do so. Some of them are meant to make you smile and have a good time.

And this is what Not Working did for me.

Book review: Maestra by L.S.Hilton

Maestra
by L.S. Hilton

9781785760037

Publication date: 10/03/2016
Hardback
Publisher: Zaffre Publishing
★★★★

I first heard about Maestra on my way to work. It was a normal day and I was on the bus checking my emails when I came across my daily subscription to The Pool. I guess it was the red cover what made me open the article and author interview, I don’t know… but I recognised the book because I had seen adverts on the tube and it appeared to be all over the media. I suppose I decided to read it because I wanted to know why people kept talking about it. Was it really that good? What was I missing? And also because my current employer told me I should give it a go. And so I did. I bought the e-book on a Thursday night and devoured it in less than a week.

The book tells the story of Judith Rashleigh, an art-lover and assistant who works in a prestigious London auction house. Her dreams of breaking into the art world have been gradually dulled by the blunt forces of snobbery and corruption. To make ends meet, she starts working as a hostess in one of the West End’s less salubrious bars. Desperate to make something of herself, she learns to dress, speak and act in the interests of men. She learns to be a good girl. However, after uncovering a conspiracy at her action house, she is fired before she can expose the fraud. In desperation, she accepts an offer from one of the bar’s clients to accompany him to the French Riviera. But when an ill-advised attempt to slip him sedatives has momentous consequences, Judith finds herself fleeing for her life. 

Now alone and in danger, all Judith has to rely on is her consummate ability to fake it amongst the rich and famous – and the inside track on the hugely lucrative art fraud that triggered her dismissal.

 

————-

I’ve never been an avid reader of crime fiction / thrillers, I tend to read non-fiction titles, YA and women’s fiction so this was the first time I met a character like Judith. And I never came across such a story before, no kidding.

I felt like the book, in the very first pages, uncovers the story little by little. Judith narrates it and I felt very close to her in the first chapters: working as an assistant, trying to develop herself, describing rush hour and struggling to get the life she knows she’s always wanted. Feelings of distance and fear started to grow as I kept on reading. I didn’t understand Judith and her morally complex personality but her wicked intelligence made me want to keep reading and discover what was going to happen.

Her story is full of explicit sex and murders – I was surprised because the main character doesn’t seem to have feelings of remorse or sadness. She is a dark, dark character but that’s her best quality too. She doesn’t disappoint, in fact, she surprises the reader every so often that I kept asking myself: ‘What is she going to do now’?

L.S. Hilton sets her story in Europe and it’s beautiful to travel from place to place, including London, Italy and France. Her descriptions are vivid and there’s moments where you cannot wait to turn the page in order to discover what’s going to happen. It is an incredibly addictive story that has many layers. However, some of those layers are truly unrealistic and exaggerated. So be prepared to feel sceptical about what happens to our protagonist.

I must confess I don’t like Judith – nor her tastes or ambitions – And that’s one of the greatest things about her: she doesn’t need anyone to like her, not even the reader. She has great psychological depth, though:  she is vivid, unrelenting, scary and leaves destruction behind her.

And the twists, oh! the twists in the book are magnificent. There’s no way the reader can be prepared to discover what happens in the story. The world of art is fascinating, the fraud and corruption and the murders make this story a delicious dark thriller that will ‘shock and please in equal measure’.

This little red book is a must read and I am looking forward to discover what happens next. Does Maestra live up to the expectations? In my opinion, it does. The book is, however, strong in graphic sexual content and if this is likely to perturb you, then be prepared. I would suggest to read the book with an open mind and you won’t be disappointed.

Now, now… can someone bring me Maestra‘s sequel?